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't talk enough about it. and i've got to tell you, that's got to change in 2013. then there's europe. today, just today, i am wearing a tie that commemorates a brilliant strategy. one which works so amazingly that i'm still dazzled by it. what's happening on this tie? it's a man, a man in a suit kicking a can down the road. you see while the europeans were kicking the can, they gave themselves times to develop a plan to allow governments and banks to raise capital and fix the respective balance sheets at lower levels than anyone thought possible. coming into the year, you know what my number one worry was? we believe that every time italy and spain would have to raise money, do those deals, interest rates would shoot through the roof, bankrupting all involved, sovereign countries, companies, banks. instead, by letting cooler heads prevail through can kicking, smart private sector investors kicked the tires, not the cans, and they bought the debt. hit home runs every time they did. as rates came down hard, courtesy of bank backstop that did work. the europeans realized if they stopped
of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonight at 8:00 on a "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the latest in the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations, we are joined by stand from -- stanley collender, and we also have josh gordon. thanks to you as well. stan, you were on last week and we ask you for the percentages. you put the chance of a fiscal cliff getting done at. this week? -- gettguest: i think there is o chance other than new year's day, and even that might be overstating it a little bit. right now i am seeing a 75% chance that they will go over the cliff. host: joshua, what odds would you give? caller: i have no idea. i would say that it could be 50 -- guest: i have no idea. i would say. the thing that americans and the public should worry about is whether they get something done soon. there is a chance that by inauguration day, something will be d
with christine lagarde from the imf. i asked about the reforms that were taking place in europe. i asked, would any of these reforms be taking place without europe being in a fiscal crisis mode? her answer was, absolutely not. unless the revolver is at the temple of the politicians with the finger on the trigger, they're not capable of summoning the collective will to tell the people that represent that they need to take steps to resolve a problem and will cause disappointment and pain to do so. my experience in the years i have had in politics was exactly that. we never would have gotten what we did in 2011 without the threat of defaulting on our debt. to think that we could put a structure in place today that perhaps we would all be comfortable with in terms of solving our long-term problems and be assured that 10 years or not that congress would not have modified that dozens of times to the response of into joints who are banging on the door and saying this is to develop much pain, we could hardly sustain a policy for months around here, let alone 10 years. if you want to fix the long-term s
. as for the action in europe, really, the action focuses on italy where there's an impending political regime change. more on that in just a moment. the road map starts at the golden arches. mcdonald's blowing out expectations for november sales after the dismal drop in the month of october. hoping to fuel the rise, the bacon/onion/cheddar sandwich. >> there's one thing for certain, taxes on top earners are going up. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had thi
. if they do keep doing it -- that helps. the businesses grew almost 100% in europe. the stock breaks out at 57. lori: we will take it. charles: relish is on me. i am taking it one step at a time. it is my third job. [talking over each other] charles: i have to make money on the side. did you see the christmas list? lori: let's do stocks based on your wife's christmas list. [ laughter ] charles: you got it. lori: let's check the markets. it has been 15 minutes since we last checked in with lauren. >> fedex shares are doing well today. they are up by just under 3%. if you took out the impact of hurricane sandy that hit in late october, fedex would have reported earnings better than expected. that would be the good news. they are keeping an outlook for the full year and also their expectations for overall u.s. economic growth. what is interesting about fedex is there air expression, they're more expensive way to ship things. if you wanted to use fedex ground, monday was the deadline. tomorrow is the deadline for ups regular ground shipping if you want those gifts in time for christmas. melissa: i
fitness award, it ain't going to happen unless i am living in europe when there is precedent when the entire european union accepts the nobel peace prize. i am serious, they are serious, the same folks who brought you riots they could not stop and protests they could not control, and now they are winning a nobel peace prize that has to be unbelievable for a union that is going off the we rails and a currency that threatens to go off the abyss to former u.k. member of parliament john brown who is going out of his mind. i cannot believe this, but, yet, when i first heard it announced, it really happened. >> yes, you are absolutely right. when i was a nato soldier myself and when i was a member of parliament i was on the political arm of nato which was the north atlantic assembly and it was clear that it was nato particularly with the american and british nuclear deterrence that kept the peace and that extended through a circle around the ussr and margaret thanker made me the escort for gorbachev and it was clear that president reagan's strategic defense initiative brought them to th
of war. two decades ago, with all eyes on europe, the united states prematurely celebrated victory over communism and an end to the cold war but in 1989, the same year the berlin wall fell, tanks roll spood tiananmen square crushing in a bloody massacre the hopes of the chinese people. while communism was gone in europe it was revitalized in the world's largest nation. pyongyang's missile launch awakens us to a fact that communism still casts a long shadow over asia. the nuclear proliveuation threaten not only our allies in the pacific but our own people as well. in asia the cold war never ended an the united states and south korean forces stand guard together on this last frontier. attempts to engage pyongyang over the past four years have been met with repeated prove cage. the kidnapping of two american journalists, repeated missile launches, one more nuclear test, the sinking of a south korean naval vessel with the loss of 46 lives and the shelling of a south korean island. how much more should we endure before we say enough is enough? sweet talking pyongyang only seems to inspire fu
. the budget deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform a
, we're going to get those types of storms and europe will particularly suffer from them. but when you get a hurricane embedded within one, then you get double dose and that's what happened with sandy and that kind of thing will happen, too if we get stronger cyclonic storms. and the damage goes like the cube of the wind speed. so it's not like -- you know, if the wind speed had been 10 miles per hour less, we wouldn't have had all that damage. those trees have been standing there for centuries. these were really big trees on our property. so there haven't been storms like that, or those trees wouldn't still have been there. >> and was there a human fingerprint on sandy? could you say how much climate change contributed to the ferocity and the intensity of sandy? >> well, there's a human fingerprint in several ways. the ocean was unusually warm along the eastern seaboard and it was warmer by more than the global average, so people are saying, oh, you can only credit one quarter of that to global warming. well, the warming, it's like, these extreme events that we're getting, we're getti
. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time. asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago. but i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america, because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that is broad based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globe balance leave. globally and i think we can get the kind of cycle that all of us have been waiting for and want to see. what is holding us back right now ironically is a lot of stuff that is going on in this town. and i know that many of you have come down here to try to see, is there a way that we can breakthrough the logjam and go ahead and get things done? and i'm here to tell you that nobody wants to get this done more than me. i know that you've got even a lot of briefings, let me just try to describe where the situation is right now with respect
around the globe, europe is in a terrible recession. they have huge debt problems. you have bigger problems in asia than you thought we would have a. ande can get this one right actually make a real road to bring in new revenue and reduce our costs so that we bring our budget into balance, i think it is a huge opportunity for economic revival in america that around the globe will make us proud and create jobs. it is tough. if the president gets its right, we have a huge ability to see an economic revival we have all been waiting for. >> let me follow up on a ci. specific point. you said earlier that indicating it should be up to states to tailor programs when it comes to implementing certain aspects of obamacare. should states have this flexibility? flexibility? >>
all over europe. >> yeah, right. >> if she's looking for her next destination, where should she go in europe? >> by train. that's what you do. >> you can sleep on it it's your hotel room for the night. >> it is but by december 31st book this deal. you get a global pass on eurail and it gives you access to 23 separate countries. you can sleep through all of them. >> you don't have to sleep through the country, but on your way to the country. >> exactly. >> skip a night paying for the hotel. two hotel deals. >> first, hilton worldwide, 40% off on weekend stays, that's across all their brands, and the best deal of all is right here in new york you've heard of restaurant week we call the dead week. they are not calling it hotel week from january 4th to the 20th. 26 different hotels here in new york offering deals as low as $100 a night versus $500 and up from that period of time from january 4th to the 20th you cannot beat that. >> i want to travel. >> i love traveling, although thinking about the train, i was once on an overnight train in europe, it literally shu
and ongoing problems in europe. the market has done better than it has usual done. what's changed? i think there will be continued political turmoil and slow growth but that's, particularly given valuations, may not be a bad year for equities as all. >> i'm going to add to that list having been a good year for the stock market. also had a lot of recovery in the housing market as well. do all these good things, all this progress become undone if we go over the fiscal cliff. >> i think clearly we've seen some healing in housing which is great and as has already been said we've seen some good progress over in europe and in china so that's all great. i'm neutral on equities in my allocation strategy fund, target rich funds and the reason for that is the fiscal cliff. if we go over the fiscal cliff then i think that given how lean companies are, and as slow as we're growing, we could see the economy dip back into recession and earnings estimates will have to go lower. >> the mastercard report on retail sales not good. the worst since '08, and you're concerned -- obviously there are those who fe
deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenue. half of that would come through tax reform and the
will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would argue that we should smooth into this drag even more. make policy changes so next year the gdp is half of this speed limit. that would be consistent with extending an emergency program and some form of tax holiday. in terms of the debt ceiling, that needs to be increased. it would be nice to extend it at the next presidential election. it would be nicer to get rid of it altogether. it is anachronistic law that is a problem. it creates a great deal of uncertainty. as you can see, it can do a lot of damage to the economy. there are a lot of reasons why it is being considered to eliminate jig there are a lot of reasonable proposals being considered to eliminate that ceiling. it should be carefully considered. at the very minimum, we should push this to the other side of the election. we do not want to address the debt ceiling on a regular basis. it is damaging confidence. on fiscal sustainability, we need deficit reduction in the next 10 years of about $3 trillion. to get there, a balanced approach would be $1.4 trillion in tax revenu
in missiles, -- winding machine. these things are used in missiles. europe has tightened up. they have been working actively in china to buy european- american-chinese goods. the government is not completed, but they're not doing enough. we're thinking that pressure needs to be brought on china. goods made in germany, sold by that company to the chinese company that thinks it will keep it in china, but in fact it is going to iran. all it a country of tr concern. we're thinking maybe it is time that china is called out on that. china needs to be pressured to stop a local in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from outfitting its centrifuge program. that effort over time has had tremendous success. with more and more sanctions, it is been more successful. more purchases stopped, more interdiction's, more trouble for iran to make progress. >> in terms of u.s. non- proliferation programs, david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist, particularly in controls and lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation. what is your assessment of non- proliferation pr
about this? >> sure. absolutely. so we do have patents in the u.s. and in asia, africa, and europe. but in addition to that we have an incredible team of engineers and scientists who are not only developing cook stoves but a whole range of energy technologies. and so where we really see our role as a company is in providing personal scale energy access that's affordable and safe and reliable. >> talk about affordability. how much is this? >> these stoves are $130. >> okay. now, you are in brooklyn, new york. but you don't make these here, right? >> we don't. >> you have a factory -- >> we manufacture -- we manufacture in asia. and then -- but it's all based on the designs and the engineering of the team right here in new york. >> now, i've looked at this in the videos. how long does it take me to make a pot of tea? >> four minutes. >> it takes us four minutes to boil a liter of water. that's it. >> four minutes? >> four minutes. >> well, guys, look, it is omg. i'm thrilled you that came here. this is jonathan cedar. okay? and john levy. biolite's chairman and ceo. thank you so much
have as in this for a while. i think there is always china, europe, and the congress that can miss this up. i think it is hard to stop this recovery. we have done everything we can to do it. we can do it again if we try hard. i think we will not succeed this time. >> we have not talked about the creation yet, which polling showed is a major concern for americans. for the long-term unemployed who have been left behind a little bit and then to the economic recovery, do you feel like the president and congress is doing enough to address the problem? what politically and realistically could be done in the next four years? >> i think the president is committed to this. i think he would like to see an extension of unemployment insurance. he would like to see it if possible an extension of the payroll tax cut. we just released a $4 trillion deficit revenue plan that calls for four and a billion dollars in short-term stimulus. we think there is a need for a infrastructure and roads and bridges. we think it has to happen sometime in the next 20 years. we have a situation with incredibly low
fact for your, chris. the region with the most modest needs for happiness was europe. germans only need about $85,000 to be happy. that want places them in the lowest on the list. the french need $114,000, the britains need 133,000. >> what about americans? >> reporter: i don't know. those are the numbers we have. but germans at the low end. dubai at the top end. i'm guessing it would depend on, you know, how much you need to live in that country and it's expensive to live in dubai and singapore. >> how much can a plate of sausage and keg of beer cost? >> reporter: they have great beer. >> yahoo! is out with its list of top obsessions for 2012. number five, honey boo-boo. the "hunger games" game in at number four fold by mega millions. political polls number two obsession and our top obsession this year, yes, it's apple and it's iphone 5. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you
minister. it happened at a meeting of the coganization for security and cooperation in europe, known as the o.s.c.e., and margaret brennan is covering for us tonight. margaret. >> reporter: well, scott, officials familiar with those talks say the russians now think that bashar al-assad may not survive the war, and they want to have influence in syria if his regime falls, or if he loses control of the chemical weapons inside of his country. u.s. officials are particularly concerned that those weapons dould fall into the hands of an al qaeda affiliate active within syria. r: pelley: so what's coming next? >> reporter: well, it's a start to a new round of diplomacy. the russians have refused to meet for months, but this is not nabreakthrough. the russians are signaling they're willing to help with the political transition, but they are still officially supporting haad. secretary clinton says the russians have refused to give him asylum. oher countries have offered, but so far, he is not negotiating his exit. assad has vowed to fight to the death. >> pelley: margaret, thank you. when the
right now, europe the in a terrible recession. you've got huge problems or bigger problems in asia than we thought we were going to have. if we can get this right in the first half of the year, i don't think it will happen before the end of the you near. if we can do this right, we can bring in more revenue and reduce our costs and reduce what we're paying out to bring our debt into balance. i think it is a huge tunts for america that around the globe will make us proud and crealt jobs. it is tough but it is an opportunity and if the president gets it right, chi believe he will, we have a huge ability to see and acknowledge that revival that we've been waiting for. >> let me follow-up on the specific point on the affordable care act. this letter sentsdz by a republican governor. many of these ideas and combha that is what the republican governors said, indicating it should be up to the states to taylor their programs when it comes to implementing the affordable care otherwise known as the obamacare. should states have the flexibility? >> yes, that is what the president has said within r
since 1989 is the region that we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. it is no longer these countries no longer even have anything in common except for the common memory of >> more to pulitzer prize winner book tv is a location that the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland where we are interviewing some professors who are also authors. we are now joined by richard ruth, a professor here at the naval academy. professor ruth, what do you teach? >> i teach predominately sian history of why in pre-modern asian history. mostly i concentrate on thailand and vietnam. >> why is it important for students to the south asian history? >> it's very much engaged in that corner of the world we have many allies and partners that we are still working with come and many students at the naval officers southeast they are going to represent our interest there. so i think it's important for them to know south east asian history to be comfortable with someand to have
't please anyone, particularly the ratings agencies, but we have all learned from europe and the debt debacle from last year that the downgrades, let's just say, they aren't that worrisome, now you don't want to be borrowing trillions of dollars, but remember, a deal without severe belt tightening will be good for the economy. that means rates can go higher and when you combine that with the billions that we spent after hurricane sandy you can see why rates are going down. it will produce a ton of jobs as spending has been held back while we waited for washington. certainty beckons and you want to be involved in the markets ahead of the certainty. that is why this is a rally in anticipation of certainty. hence why the banks are going higher. and they can loan out your money what you were getting on your cds and your savings account. which brings me to gold. lots of people think when you buy gold, you do it because inflation is about that. i think the recent move down in gold confirms that interest rates are going higher. gold may have yet further to fall. i still like gold. so to sum
of the next 10, 15 and 20 years. some people look to europe and say austerity there is not working. and i agree. an austerity program that's too quick can only make our problems worse. but i also see parts of europe that said by kicking the can down the road they can ignore their problems. and the only thing worse than austerity is the bond markets forcing a crisis upon your economy, forcing a crisis that would make a divide between spending and revenues more unsustainable. if we wait 3 years, 5 years, 10 years, 12 years from now we will be unable to safely deal with these problems. that's why we need a balanced and responsible deal now. after the election, many of my colleagues, particularly those on the republican side, have sort of publicly acknowledged that we need new revenue, has to be part of the solution. i believe even some of the numbers the president put forward in terms of revenue goals are too modest in terms of of what is needed to be put back into the revenue stream not to grow the size of government but to simply pay our bills. it is critically important that this new reve
democrats and in europe. they need some time to be more able -- to be able -- they are very successful on the side of the opposition. right now in sight of the government, there is a tremendous responsibility. we have seen that from the parliamentarian elections were the muslim brothers in egypt but the majority. until the results, they lost 4 million of votes. this is why we have a responsibility in the united states to support democratic institutions not allowing any ideological block to hijack the revolution or the institutions. at the same time, not taking sides. that will have a negative impact. it is an important asset to combat the jihad tests or the extremists. -- jihadists or the extremists. the muslim brothers in tunisia .ccused this is why we have to a differentiates between the muslim brothers and the girondists. do not put all the islamists in one basket. -- jihadists. do not put all the islamists in one basket. are they committed to values. this is the most important thing. >> and we have seen in syria where they had a violent fight between the muslim brothers and the ala
a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it creates a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage of government spending is more than its should be related to total gdp. if there is an easier for millet in the history of economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out natural-gas as a country. connecting this cheap product with a more expensive market and getting it overseas. if we could become energy self- sufficien
headlines all over the world. conor powell begins with a financial crisis in europe. >> the eurozone continues with a huge financial hole. standard & poor's downgraded in nine countries in the union. financial ministers reaching an agreement on another greek bailout. a lot of trouble with debt ridden banks. europe demanding an end to stringent austerity measures that all this resulted in the eurozone going back into another recession. thirty-two people dead, including two americans off the coast of italy. when the cost of concorde a cruise ship runs aground >> more than 79 people killed and 8000 injured. a district court says that they would like to oust president hosni mubarak to life in prison. and mohammed morsi, of the muslim brotherhood party takes charge for it in november, he grants himself absolute power that brings thousands of protesters to the streets of cairo, egypt. three members of a russian all-female punk band stage a protest against vladimir putin are sent to jail for hooliganism. inciting worldwide protest and demand for the release. rupert murdoch launches into the
coming under pressure recently starting to turn. europe seeing improvement helping equities along as well. lori: not sure if you mentioned the fed. we were talking about it at the top. talking about their expectations of ben bernanke. nicole: would even throw out the idea of stimulus? that helped things along pushing us along throughout this entire last six months. lori: absolutely. thank you so much, nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. protests turn violent in lansing, michigan, as union protesters ripped down a tent belonging to right-to-work supporters. becoming the 24th right-to-work states today allowing workers to get the right to join unions. jeff flock is in lansing michigan covering the story for us. i thought it was interesting how you covered the scene there with michigan a few years back, excuse me, wisconsin. >> wisconsin, exactly. not the same kind of intensity. part of that is because this is already pretty much a done deal. there they had not a teacher headed off. the second one being debated right now. but renew over here to the scene of the geo
? >> quite simply, europe looks so bad where would you put the money? alternative to --. lori: talking about that for a year now. there is no interest payment in u.s. bond. u.s. stocks are really a better return right now. >> well they are right now but if we go over the cliff you might not want to repeat that statement. cash might, a lot of people are going to have to move to cash if they really feel shaky about the u.s. government. but gold. we might see a boom in gold. lori: buy up that bullion. bury it in the backyard. real hard asset. >> just like french farmers. lori: no kidding. tracy: peter, you're great. have a happy new year. >> happy new year, friend. lori: i wasn't arguing with him. i was agreeing with him. tracy: you're question is a good one. where are the bond vigilantees? they have been gone for months now. lori: for years. tracy: for years, you're right, my goodness another housing bailout, the government backing up a plan to bail out underwater homeowners that may ultimately leave you on the hook. tracy: let's look how oil is trading as we head out to break. it is up almost
to take down a jet liner in europe or africa. >> seth, isn't that the problem? what we saw in libya was all those weapons have gone missing. now they're elsewhere in northern africa and some got into the hands of hamas in gaza. syria seems to be libya on steroids in terms of the things that could go wrong. >> i think it's kind of ludicrous to provide them with surface to air missiles. i think what they need more than anything else is ammunition and small arms. they can do a lot with just that kind of activity. and really intelligence. especially with the internet going down, it's harder for them to communicate with each other. radios are down across the country. they need help in a range of ways. i think our intelligence apparatus and our special operations units can do this in general and have done this clandestinely over the years, so i think we can do this and provide some oversight. >> if we do it, do we have -- will it have any impact on the outcome? the u.s. does think strategically. like it or not, they do. if i'm giving you a gun, are you going to do something when you get i
it to europe, other countries we can travel, so people in this country can travel to those countries knowing they're not going to be handicapped any more than they are by facilities. why would a republican vote against such a deal? you first and then john. >> there's a lot of pressure from the right on this. there's the paranoia from the u.n. >> explain it. >> the notion that the u.n. is going to come in and tell us what to do. the fact of the matter is this treaty raises the world to the standard of the u.s. doesn't require the u.s. to change its standards at all and doesn't in any way give the u.n. power to do anything in this country. but i think it's -- all you have to do is say u.n. and people on the right get very exorcised. rick santorum helped lead the opposition to this treaty. i think he's out of step with the american people, out of step, by the way, on this tax cuts for the rich stuff. you know, bobby jindal said today, and i thought it was remarkable, we're in danger of becoming the party that defends the rich, anti-medicare, anti-social security, and there's no future in that k
they react. one of the things that has happened since 1989 is the reason we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have much in common with one another except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more >anne applebaum from her historical narrative, "iron curtain," sunday night on "q &a " on that night at 8:00. >> at 10:00 eastern, efforts to increase homeownership programs hosted by the burping institution. in 30 minutes, the national taxpayer advocate discusses what the fiscal cliff needs for -- means for tax filing season. the doc fix will be explained that at 9:15, i look at how the u.s. population is expected to u.s. population is expected to change over the
and the army family especially being over in europe. give love to daddy. he misses him. this hardest part s being the mommy and the daddy. >> merry christmas! >> how is everybody doing? >> all right. here today to receive a couple of care packages. we have ones that were packed by our rfg. they were packed especially for you. it is a by name box. we were talking about some stuff and people were saying that america has kind of foregotten about the war that has been going on for more than ten years now. for most people that is not true because you have is complete stranges and, of course, mr. chuck norris and soldier's angels who took the time out of their day and their own pocket to send you a care package. >> let you know how big he is getting even though i'm not there. like you can tell by how he does stuff. >> hi, babe. i just want to say i love you and i can't wait for you to come home. i miss you so much. >> hey, babe, have a good day. see you soon. not too much longer and you will be home. love you. bye, babe. >> i would do anything for them. and that is one -- that is pretty much my m
were mainly back in those days focused on fighting the war in europe. >> harris: for people just joining us, general norman schwarzkopf has died. he led operation desert shield and desert storm which were the largest deployments of u.s. forces and equipment since the vietnam war and general scales you just mentioned president george h.w. bush is ailing in the hospital but we have just gotten a statement from the former president and i want to share it with our viewers if you are still with us. the former president says "barbara and i mourn the loss of a true american patriot and one of the great mill tare leaders of our generation. hailing from westpoint. general norman schwarzkopf to me epitomized the service the dallesty creed that served our great nation through this trying natural crises. a good and decent man and a good friend. barbara and i send our condolences to his from our family. this from president george h.w. bush ailing in the hospital but speaking out in his statement about the passing of general schwarzkopf. general scales, are you still with us by phone? did we l
is that coming from because i see china coming back a little, maybe europe's done going down, we seem to be a little bit stalled. somebody's building something around this world. >> i think it's a matter of jabil being very competitive in the markets we serve and having sufficient diversification so that if one part of our business, for instance networking on telecommunications may be going through a lull or slower period with government spending and bess spending, capital spending down, we have some other parts of our business that are doing extremely well. you mentioned some of the mechanics business we're involved in which we call our consumer technology business. that has nothing to do with electronics so we don't have to sell any electronic hardware for those businesses to perform well. parts of our business are a reflection of the economy and other parts of our business are growing very robustly. so i'm very hopeful for the balance of the year and, you know, i think the company is diversified enough to take advantage of whatever opportunities are out there. >> okay. i am so glad
of a gene use. jen use. it might make them so powerful no one in europe can stand up to this em. a century from now is not my problem. the news goes back. they take the news of the purchase back. the news arrives in boston. boston is the federalist tear toy. it's the opposition for the jefferson administration. that want to deprive jefferson of try yumple. they set off a fireworks display. it wasn't a controversial thing in american politics. no. american politicians were really enthusiastic about this. news gets to washington, and the senate starts to debate the ratification of this and the only nature of the obstacle arises jefferson himself lead him to believe that the federal government did not have the power to acquire a territory. and he starts to hem and haw say we need a constitutional amendment to give the government the power. napoleon back in france had overthrown the government. he was not exactly -- >> host: constitution nap. >> guest: yeah. not repressed by the argument. he started make noises saying i'm going revoke the treaty. madison, our baseline alternative comes to jeff
>> credit rating was reduced. >> we don't want to end up like europe. lou: great to see you both. now time for your h comments. writing into their hope barack obama gets all the taxes he wants. i'll bthe first to say i toldd you so when the consequence happens.n t people learn the hard way.n obama never negotiate, he just demands something of complaints. when he doesn't get what he wants. he is far more mature than that, don't you think? we will keep thinking about that. thank you for your comments. we love hearing from you. we love hearing from you. >>> a massive winter storm wreaks havoc bringing blinding snow and devastang tornadoes. at least six are dead, over a thousand flights canceled nationwide stranding holiday travelers and worries things could get worse. welcome, i'm eric bolling in for neil cavuto and this is your world and we're tracking a deadly winter storm as it makes its way towards the east coast. in indiana, heavy snow stranding dozens of vehicles asolkseal with blizzard. a foot in bloming to know. across the south and southst 34 twisters leveled homes. in miss
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